Fiber Fests Q&A

Another Q&A from nothingbutknit2!

Q. Have you attended a fiber festival? What did you think? Were you overwhelmed or in your element? If you’ve never been do you want to attend a fiber festival?

A. Yes, I’ve attended several fiber festivals. I love them!

Q. What is your favorite part of a festival? Do you enjoy the items available for purchase, the animals or are you all about hanging with other crafters?

A. I love it all, but my favorite is purchasing hand spun, hand dyed yarn directly from the makers.

Q. If you’ve attended more than one festival (you lucky crafter) which is your favorite and why? If you haven’t attended one, which one would you most like to attend?

A. I’ve attended Maryland Sheep and Wool, Great Lakes Fiber Show, A Wool Gathering, a local knitting conference, and a Knitter’s Review retreat. My favorite was the retreat. I got to sit around and knit in the Shenandoah Mountains and visit a winery with Annie Modesitt!

Q. I’ve been seeing lots of ads for crafty travel. Basically it’s a trip centered around a craft like knitting. You travel to a place and become a craft-centered tourist. There are also cruises where instructors teach classes on the ship. Have you seen these ads? Do you think you’d like to travel in a craft centered way? Would you like to visit wool mills in Ireland, Scotland or New Zealand? Would you want to take a cruise with your favorite designer?

A. I would skip the cruise but I would love to visit the Shetlands on a knitting themed trip. I follow Stitchtopia on Instagram! Iceland is on my bucket list too.

Speaking of, years ago when I was at that local conference, I purchased a hank of Cheryl Oberle’s Dancing Colors yarn, pic above. I have finally found the perfect pattern for it!

celtic myths shawl

(photo by lu7623 on Ravelry)

Color Theory!

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I really enjoyed my Color Theory class at Yarn It and Haberdashery, Look at Esther! Can you imagine a better person to learn from about Color Theory?

The best tip of the evening was learning to use colors that are opposite (or almost) on the color wheel but also using cool tones against warm tones to really make them pop. I can’t wait to get my Milarrochy Tweed yarn to see how the palette works together!

In the meantime, I will make some black and white copies of my chart and color in some potential options.

I also purchased a new skein of yarn to start on Brassica, which I fell in love with while swiping through my Ravelry app. Although I would have loved to have used the Cascade called for, I found instead a skein of Berroco Ultra Alpaca Chunky in – guess what color? Grey.

Last night, I confessed to the fun and funky ladies at class that I’m a boring knitter. Esther corrected me and called me an “Over the Pond” knitter. Her shop is filled with bright and fun colors, and everyone is knitting speckled yarn. She says that’s what the Americans like. But not me. It’s true. I follow KnitBritish. I like natural fibers in neutral colors. I like cables and texture work, and if colors, then stranded Fair Isle or Nordic colorways. One time I took a “What kind of knitter are you?” quiz, and the answer was “Purist.”

I waxed rhapsodic about my navy stockinette pullover I will knit for myself one day. There were a lot of eye rolls.

I’m exaggerating a bit, but I do think it’s interesting. I like the history of knitting. I like the tradition. I want to hug sheep.

Speaking of, I have an exciting field trip this week which I can’t wait to blog about next weekend!

Will I blog tomorrow and make this a two-blog weekend? I guess we will find out tomorrow!

More Looking Back (and a Free Pattern)

Back in the old Liberty Handknits days – one of my small businesses I tried to get off the ground – the Button Up Cloche was my most popular and best selling handknit. It was the first pattern I wrote out and dared to put out into the world. I submitted it to a knitting publication, though it was not accepted. I did sell a few on Etsy. I thought it might be fun to offer it here for free!

This pattern only includes the pie crust cable pattern for the brim, but you can knit any cabled pattern that can be worked in bulky yarn in a panel of about 4 inches, button the ends together, turn it on its side, and knit a hat on top!

Button Up Cloche Knitting Pattern

I found the pattern in an old email I had sent to myself for some reason, in Microsoft Works format! 😆 Luckily I found a file converter online.

I didn’t have as much luck finding the Geensie pattern.

I really like this hat, though, and will probably try to recreate it, or some variation of it. And it’s hard to believe my eldest son is now a full grown man!