Bobbles and Tudors, Thistles and Sunflowers

West Highland Way the 5th (knitting pattern) arrived this week. It is covered in bobbles. I love it!

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(Photo credit: katedaviesdesigns.com)

Look at those perfect bobbles! My bobbles don’t look half so good. I downloaded the pattern and looked at how her bobbles are made. Of course they are made differently than the instructions I’ve been following.

I may have to knit this. It’s lovely. But I will probably wait it out a bit to see what other patterns are on the horizon. I have a pretty limited yarn allowance.

If I do knit this, what color? I love Campion (red.) But, as we all know, dark blue (Lochan) is my color. That will be a tough choice.

I also love the The Shieling. My husband is a (maternal) McLean, and wore his tartan on our wedding day. My boys also wore McLean tartan ties, and they all wore thistles in their boutonnieres. So the thistle is mighty close to my heart. This might replace the gansey bed cover I was planning for our tiny house.

bob with thistle boutonniere.jpg

It’s a Canada Thistle , and not a Scottish thistle, because we used a florist that sources from local farms and wildcrafters. (I’m not sure we could get Scottish Thistles here even if we tried.)

Anyway, the boys had thistles. The girls had sunflowers. It was a beautiful fall day. And I made my own dress. Lovely.

bob and alissa-30

The boys are standing on a log here. That’s why they tower over everyone.

Maybe I could knit some sunflower cushions that would work with the thistle blanket?

I have been reading Tudor: Passion, Manipulation, Murder. I love English history, and this book is well written but still manages to flesh out the bones. Did the Tudor princes read Machiavelli, or was The Prince written about them? It was published around the same time. Probably neither. Perhaps it simply reflected the times. But you could learn a lot from this book if you were an insecure monarch, or a ruthless entrepreneur.

While I was searching for names and images of some of the lesser known figures in the book, I came across this compilation of sketches by Hans Holbein the Younger. They are stunning. Almost photographic. They have a quickness and liveliness that is missing in formal paintings, like the past brought to life.

Of course I googled “Tudor knitting” and landed on “Tudor Roses,” a book by Alice Starmore. I reserved it from the library. I doubt I will knit anything from it, but I’m sure I will enjoy looking through it.

One of the things I love about this time period is the use of symbols, which is discussed lightly in the book. Tudors were great at Public Relations, masters of spin!

Red Rose for Lancaster. White Rose for York. Tudor Rose combines both and symbolizes rightful reign.

Thistle for Bob. Sunflower for Alissa…

Sunthistle, anyone?

One thought on “Bobbles and Tudors, Thistles and Sunflowers

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